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July 14-18 2014

Traceability

Did you know nearly one third of all the seafood we purchase from the grocery store or order at a restaurant is not what we think it is? One solution for this seafood fraud is traceability, which tracks fish from the moment it leaves the water until it ends up on your plate, providing consumers and chefs with valuable information about the fish they buy.

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THIS WEEK’S TERMS

TRACEABILITY

Traceability provides consumers with valuable and verifiable information about the food they buy. It helps explain the integrity of the product, its origins, species, and its legal production under a competent management regime. Traceability means accountability, it’s a guide for responsible ocean stewardship and a safeguard protecting a vital natural resource.

SEAFOOD FRAUD

Seafood Fraud happens any time a customer thinks he or she is getting one thing and they’re getting another. It can be mislabeling, a weight lower than what’s advertised, or a fish the customers thinks is caught by one particular gear method when it’s really caught by another.—Dr. Michael Hirshfield, Chief Scientist for Oceana

OVERFISHING

Overfishing happens when fish are taken out of the water faster than they can reproduce to maintain their optimum population size. When fish stocks can no longer sustain a commercial fishery, fishermen have to find other jobs. The repercussions and the trickle-down effect—to both the marine food web and fishing communities—can be critical and severe.—Jennifer Kemmerly, Director of Seafood Watch

TRANSPARENCY

Transparency verification of the fish is provided by independent, third parties, who offer the ability to easily, economically and readily view the entire logistics chain.

EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONES (EEZ)

Sovereign territorial limits that extend two hundred miles beyond a country’s coastline.

CHAIN OF CUSTODY

Documentation that tells what a fish has been eating or how long it’s been out of the water.

BYCATCH

Fish that are caught unintentionally when fishing for other species.

SHORT FILM: “TRACEABILITY”

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FILM SYNOPSIS

Studies show that nearly one-third of all the fish that consumers buy isn’t what they think it is. Scotty Fraser of Norpac in Honolulu, Hawaii explains that one possible solution for seafood fraud is traceability, which tracks fish from the moment it leaves to water until it ends up on your plate, providing consumers with valuable information about the fish they buy.

FEATURED IN THIS EPISODE

Scotty Fraser, General Manager at NORPAC Fisheries Export, a company whose platform incorporates Best Practices, Gear Modification, Complete Traceability and full compliance with Regional Fisheries Management Organizations.

FILM DISCUSSION GUIDE FOR THE CLASSROOM

Excerpt from Lexicon’s Film Discussion Guide “Traceability”:

As consumers, we may not be aware of what is going on in the food industry. And without the correct knowledge, we cannot make informed decisions or demands. This is when seafood fraud occurs—when a customer thinks he or she is getting one thing and they are really getting another. This could mean it is mislabeling or falsely advertised.

Come up with some ways you can personally overcome seafood fraud at the market or in the a restaurant.

Download Film Discussion Guide

“Fish 101: Every Fish Has a Tale
Why Story Matters to the Ocean”

By Future of Fish

The real victim of seafood fraud and mislabeling is not the consumer; it’s the ocean. If we can’t build a global market in which responsibly harvested fish garners a better price than fish caught by plunderers and pirates, then no economic incentives exist to spur industry change.

Link: Check out this useful information about rebuilding the global fishing market.

“Seafood Traceability: The Business Case for Better Data”

By Cheryl Dahle, Future of Fish

The problems caused by seafood fraud can’t be fixed simply by the decision of a few consumers to “eat local.” We need to rebuild the systems and behaviors of the global interconnected brokers, corporations and governments that touch your food before it hits your plate. Pulling that off will require better data.

Link: Check out this useful information about traceability.

SFW type and tuna-01“Helping Businesses Become Ocean Stewards and Change Agents”

We’re seeing a growing number of businesses using their market influence to affect positive change up and down the supply chain. By educating their clients, customers and suppliers about the importance of sustainable seafood, these businesses not only become powerful agents of change, but they set themselves apart in the marketplace.

Link: Check out this useful information about how you can get involved.

 “MAKE BETTER SEAFOOD CHOICES” BY SEAFOOD WATCH

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FILM SYNOPSIS

Learn how to help protect fish and ocean animals by making good decisions when purchasing seafood. The decisions you make when choosing seafood at grocery stores and restaurants directly impact the health of our oceans.

Seafood Watch provides recommendations based on scientific research and strict fishing/farming sustainability criteria. You can use one of the many free tools (iPhone and Android app and consumer guides) provided by Seafood Watch to start making a difference today! Get involved at http://www.seafoodwatch.org.

 

Traceability on the Farm and in the Garden

By Tucker Taylor

Tracking the inputs and outputs of a garden may not be the most romantic part of farming, but the process is essential for building trust with the consumers and chefs who buy my farm’s produce and for ensuring sustainable production.  Using production records, I note inputs like compost, soil amendments, seeds and organic and biological pest controls. As farmers, we care about these items as much as a chef cares about the quality of everything that goes into a dish. My farm plan consists of a map of my field, what was planted, when it was planted, and how much was planted. Using produce flow diagrams, we track everything about the harvest, what was collected, how much, by whom, at what time, and where it was packed for transport. This valuable information helps us in the rare cases we need to trace back and locate challenges in the chain of production. Not only is such attention to detail appreciated by our customers, it helps us as growers become more efficient and productive.

 

Tucker TaylorTucker Taylor is an expert in certified organic farming, specialty produce, and sustainability. Taylor strongly believes in soil cultivation—with a healthy dose of compost—as the key to a good harvest. He is now the first Director of Culinary Gardens for Jackson Family Wines, where he spearheads the cultivation of all the company’s gardens globally. Prior to joining the Kendall Jackson family, Tucker oversaw landscaping at every property of the world-renowned chef Thomas Keller’s restaurants (French Laundry, Per Se, Bouchon, Ad Hoc), setting the standard for today’s farm-to-table fine dining. Follow him on Instagram @farmert
 
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INFORMATION ARTWORK

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LEX215_TRACEABILITY-187

Information Artwork Text

Title: Traceability
Location: Norpac, Honolulu, HI
Featuring: Scott Fraser
Image Credit: Douglas Gayeton for the Lexicon of Sustainability
Found on Page 205 in Local: The New Face of Food and Farming in America

Traceability provides consumers with valuable (and verifiable) information about the food they buy. It helps explain the integrity of the product, its origin, true identity (species), and its legal production under a competent management regime.

Without all of this information, fisheries have a lower level of confidence in the data they use to manage the fishery, and consumers have lower confidence regarding the integrity, origin and species they are consuming. Traceability means accountability, it’s a guide for responsible ocean stewardship and a safeguard protecting a vital natural resource.

Information Artwork Text

Title: Bycatch
Location: Biloxi, MS
Featuring: Richard and Melanie Johnson
Image Credit: Douglas Gayeton for the Lexicon of Sustainability
Found on Page 208 in Local: The New Face of Food and Farming in America

Bycatch is anything other than the target species which ends up getting caught in a fisherman’s net. For shrimpers this can include, crab, fish and squid.

Richard and Melanie Johnson say the most sustainable thing they can do with bycatch is eat it, and they do. Besides, if they ate their catch, they’d be eating their profits. Eating bycatch provides an economical form of sustenance.

STORY BANK INTERVIEW

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Cheryl Dahle, Future of Fish

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 “LOBSTER PIE” BY THE PERENNIAL PLATE

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FILM SYNOPSIS

Lobster fisherman get up very early, they work hard, they hate government regulations and if you try to trap in their area, you might end up with some broken legs. Just kidding! But only sort of… enter Lewis of the Pemaquid Lobster co-op, an adorable sous chef, and a delicious Maine Lobster Bake.

PAINT YOUR OWN POSTER!

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Host a painting party with these in your classroom, or at your home and invite the neighbors over! The Lexicon of Sustainability is excited to present a new way to participate in the movement. Inspired by street artists, the Lexicon has converted our popular information artwork into posters for anyone and everyone to paint and share with their community.

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STORY BANK INTERVIEW

Barton Seaver, For Cod and Country

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Week-7-Traceability

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